SKHS In The News Winter 2017

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In The News – March 24, 2017

Ian Janssen (SKHS Prof) & Veronica Poitras (SKHS PhD Grad) discuss sedentary behaviour & benefits of physical activity

Scanlan: Kids are now heavier, rounder and weaker — the fix ought to be simple (snipped from the Ottawa Sun) 

Wayne Scanlan  /  First posted: Thursday, March 23, 2017 07:00 PM EDT | Updated: Thursday, March 23, 2017 08:54 PM EDT

A 12-year-old millennial is taller, heavier, rounder and weaker that a typical child a quarter-century earlier. So says a professor of pediatrics and a leading expert on childhood obesity. Part four of a four-part series by Wayne Scanlan on youth fitness and sports specialization.

Ian Janssen, SKHS Professor discusses the cost of sedentary behaviour in Canadians and the associated economic impact / Veronica Poitras, SKHS PhD Graduate, says research shows even moderate physical activity may be important for health promotion.

CLICK HERE for FULL STORY in Ottawa Sun online

CLICK HERE for FULL STORY in PDF format

 

In The News March 22, 2017

Jean Côté, SKHS Professor, keynote speaker at sold-out NYSI Youth Coaching Conference – 250 attend sold-out NYSI Youth Coaching Conference

By Les Tan on March 14, 2017 Industry in Motion (snipped)

Views: 1,336

Suntec Singapore International Convention and Exhibition Centre, Friday, March 10, 2017 — “Very often we think about the outcomes of sport. (But) what created those outcomes? Setting an environment that is positive for the kids, diversification, and play. The relational aspects of coaching, if we applied it well, it will lead to some very positive outcomes,” said Prof Jean Côté (School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University) at the Youth Coaching Conference organised by the National Youth Sports Institute (NYSI).

CLICK HERE for FULL STORY online

CLICK HERE for FULL STORY in PDF Version

 

In The News January 20, 2017

Brendon Gurd talks to the Kingston Herald & The Telegraph about how to tell if your workouts are working (updated 23Jan2017)

Dr. Brendon Gurd, Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen`s University talked to Dick Mathison of the Kingston Herald on Thursday 19 Jan 2017 about:

Study: Here’s How to Tell if Your Workouts are Working

Dick Mathison | 2017/01/19 (snipped)

A recent study published by Queen’s University and the University of Ottawa may explain why your workout sessions aren’t bring you the results you think you should be.

Research from the two universities monitored 21 men and women who completed two types of exercise workouts during two individual training periods, with a lull between them that lasted a set period of months.

CLICK HERE to read the FULL STORY in the Kingston Herald online

CLICK HERE to read the FULL STORY in PDF version

 

Dr. Gurd was also interviewed by The Telegraph, Lifestyle/Beauty section, Victoria Hall, Acting Beauty Director, on 23 January 2017 • 6:00am

CLICK HERE to read the FULL STORY in The Telegraph

CLICK HERE to read the FULL STORY in PDF version

 

In The News 

Jacob Bonafiglia, MSc Candidate – in Men’s Journal & The Telegraph – discusses what to do when your workout isn’t working

 

Jacob Bonafiglia, MSc Candidate in muscle physiology, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University discussed his reaearch on exercise non-responders in Men’s Journal, Health & Fitness Section, Jan 2017.

(snipped from article) If this is you, don’t give up yet. A first-of-its-kind study suggests that your body can in fact respond favorably to exercise — maybe just not to the exact workouts you’ve been doing.  Researchers from Queen’s University in Ontario recruited 21 active adults to test two types of cycling training. Four times a week for three weeks, everyone completed either a steady-pace endurance regimen (30 minutes of continuous pedaling at 65 percent aerobic capacity) or high-intensity intervals (eight 20-second all-out sprints separated by 10 seconds of rest). After the first testing period, everyone took three months off to let their fitness fall back to baseline.

CLICK here to read the FULL STORY online in Men’s Journal

CLICK here to read the FULL STORY in PDF format

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